The Red Queen

The Book of Onei is an antinomian dream grimoire, providing deceptive yet true information about the art of Oneiromancy or dream magic in the form of poetry, fantasy, and intentionally ambiguous instructions.

 

A pale, dark-haired fairy queen dressed in red, presiding over the wild celebrations of the Kind.

 

The elven queen’s in red tonight,

The night is hard and wild.

Her eyes reflect a distant light,

It makes him glad to see the sight.

He giggles like a child.

 

“I warned you once, each seven years…”

She says. Her face is grim.

The kiss she gave him long ago

Means little now, but even so,

It matters most to him.

 

“I kissed you once. It seemed that we…

But then, you had such words.”

She cannot shake his foolish grin

Despite her people, closing in,

As close as hungry birds.

 

“I’m sorry that we ever met.”

She says it soft and low.

They say the Lady has no heart.

That’s true enough, but it was art

That snared her, even so.

 

“I always try to stop myself.

It always ends the same.

And you, so fair and full of flesh-

But it was I who wove the mesh.”

She looks away in shame.

 

“Enough of this. The land of dreams

Demands your mortal life.”

She lifts her hand and lets it fall-

And with a sudden, hungry call

She turns and draws the knife.

 

– from the Book of Onei, Part III: The Powers of Onei

 

Image by Giovanni Segantini
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The Blood Wisdom

The Book of Onei is an antinomian dream grimoire, providing deceptive yet true information about the art of Oneiromancy or dream magic in the form of poetry, fantasy, and intentionally ambiguous instructions.

 

A queen hanging from an apple tree on a plain of ice.

 

An apple tree upon a plain of ice,

Stands out against the sky. There hangs a queen,

Unclothed, but armed, among the leaves. Unseen,

 

The wheels of heaven turn. I feel their weight,

And in the cold I cannot catch my breath.

She grins at me. “It smells of sweat and death.

 

Blood wisdom’s always like that. If you took

A cup of it you’d see it’s dark as wine

And never sweet, but oh so strong. You’d find

 

Yourself upon an apple tree…” She laughs

And thunder rolls as if a mighty door

Had turned upon its hinge. “We’ve met before,”

 

That’s all that I can say. She starts to keen,

A supersonic whine, as sharp and clear

As broken church bells. “Come and find me here.”

 

This is the blood wisdom, and it smells of sweat and death.

 

– from the Book of Onei, Part III: The Powers of Onei

 

Image by Giovanni Segantini

Boneyard Goddess

The Book of Onei is an antinomian dream grimoire, providing deceptive yet true information about the art of Oneiromancy or dream magic in the form of poetry, fantasy, and intentionally ambiguous instructions.

Burn a black candle and visualize the long-haired goddess of the graveyard, she who crouches on a tomb with her face in shadow. Recite this charm to dream of the dead.

 

Goddess of the boneyard, hear me

Through these ghosts that hover near me.

Clear the way through clay and water,

Death’s companion, wisdom’s daughter,

Clear the way that I may travel

Through this sand and rock and gravel,

Through this soil as black as midnight

To the place that knows no sunlight,

Only starshine always gleaming,

To the dead where they lie dreaming,

Bound by death’s white silken tether.

They and I have work together.

 

Thou and I have work together!

 

– from the Book of Onei, Part III: The Powers of Onei

 

Image by Carlos Schwabe